AAIAC

The Alliance of Alcohol Industry Attorneys & Consultants is a select organization of alcoholic beverage licensing and compliance professionals.

Tennessee ABC simplifies corporate changes

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Category: abc, Alcoholic Beverage Commission

02.11.19

As the Tennessee Alcoholic Beverage Commission’s online licensing system known as RLPS nears its first anniversary, the ABC continues to refine and enhance the system. This post explores improvements for larger corporate license holders. 

Change in Control of Corporate Owners

A change in corporate officers can trigger the need to file an amendment to the RLPS license. For publically traded companies, licensees owned by investment funds and other more-complicated ownership structures, corporate officers at the license level are treated as “owners,” because the officers are deemed by the ABC to control the licensee. A change in one of the officers constitutes a change of control, similar to a change in ownership of the licensee.

Officer changes trigger the need to pay a $300 application fee and file new RLPS questionnaires and copies of government IDs. The ABC will review the officer disclosures and, if in order, approve the amendment to the license.

This process does not apply to closely-held companies, like restaurants and bars that are owned by one or two individuals. 

Master Files for LBD Licensees

We have great news for publicly traded companies and other complicated license holders.  The ABC has recently made master company records available for liquor by the drink licensees. 

Master company records have been available for food store applicants for a couple of years.  We find master company records to be particularly helpful where an address or officer change needs to be made to several license files. 

If a licensee has a master company record, the change only needs to be made to the master company record. If not, you have to go in and individually revise each license for simple changes, such as disclosure of a new officer.

The ABC is still working out the details with officer changes and we encourage folks to stay tuned for more information.

All those changes in corporate officers makes us think of the Queen favorite:

And another one gone, and another one gone

Another one bites the dust

Hey, I'm gonna get you, too

Another one bites the dust

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Tennessee Alcoholic Beverage chairman Bryan Kaegi resigns

Tennessee ABC puts the smack down on Jell-O shots

Dead again: Court strikes down Tennessee residency requirement for liquor store owners

Can I bring my own wine into a restaurant in Tennessee?

Gov. Haslam taps newest ABC Commissioner

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Tennessee ABC simplifies corporate changes

blog

Tennessee ABC simplifies corporate changes

Feb 11, 2019

As the Tennessee Alcoholic Beverage Commission’s online licensing system known as RLPS nears its first anniversary, the ABC continues to refine and enhance the system. This post explores improvements for larger corporate license holders. 

Change in Control of Corporate Owners

A change in corporate officers can trigger the need to file an amendment to the RLPS license. For publically traded companies, licensees owned by investment funds and other more-complicated ownership structures, corporate officers at the license level are treated as “owners,” because the officers are deemed by the ABC to control the licensee. A change in one of the officers constitutes a change of control, similar to a change in ownership of the licensee.

Officer changes trigger the need to pay a $300 application fee and file new RLPS questionnaires and copies of government IDs. The ABC will review the officer disclosures and, if in order, approve the amendment to the license.

This process does not apply to closely-held companies, like restaurants and bars that are owned by one or two individuals. 

Master Files for LBD Licensees

We have great news for publicly traded companies and other complicated license holders.  The ABC has recently made master company records available for liquor by the drink licensees. 

Master company records have been available for food store applicants for a couple of years.  We find master company records to be particularly helpful where an address or officer change needs to be made to several license files. 

If a licensee has a master company record, the change only needs to be made to the master company record. If not, you have to go in and individually revise each license for simple changes, such as disclosure of a new officer.

The ABC is still working out the details with officer changes and we encourage folks to stay tuned for more information.

All those changes in corporate officers makes us think of the Queen favorite:

And another one gone, and another one gone

Another one bites the dust

Hey, I'm gonna get you, too

Another one bites the dust

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Hail to the chief: Tennessee ABC names new top dog

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Category: abc

01.31.19

Russell F. Thomas

Drumroll please  . . . cue the trumpets for the fanfare . . .

Russell F. Thomas was named Director for the Tennessee Alcoholic Beverage Commission at today’s regular TABC meeting.  Director Thomas assumes the top leadership position following the resignation of Interim Director Zack Blair and former Director Clay Byrd. 

The Tullahoma native holds a B.A. in political science from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.  He was an Alpha Tau Omega.

Thomas earned his J.D. from UT in 2003.  He practiced for four years as an Assistant District Attorney General in Nashville, where he “prosecuted hundreds of misdemeanor and felony cases, including D.U.I. drug offenses, white-collar offenses and murder,” according to Justia.

He worked as a solo practitioner from 2007 until his appointment, where he specialized in criminal defense, DUI and general civil litigation.  He is a 2014 Fellow of the Nashville Bar Foundation.

Thomas’ wife, Mary Beth Thomas, serves as General Counsel to the Tennessee Secretary of State, where she has worked since 2013.  We suspect they are former buddies from UT Knoxville, from which Mary Beth Thomas holds a B.S. in Finance and a 2003 J.D.  Mary Beth Thomas is an alum of our firm, Waller, where she worked as a litigator. 

All this talking about the Tennessee ABC reminds us of Midland’s hit song, “Drinkin’ Problem”

“People say I got a drinkin’ problem

But I got no problem drinkin’ at all

They keep on talkin’

Drawing conclusions

They call it a problem,

I call it a solution.”

Drinking is our business and it ain’t no problem. 

We welcome Director Thomas and wish him well in his new position.

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Tennessee ABC puts the smack down on Jell-O shots

Dead again: Court strikes down Tennessee residency requirement for liquor store owners

Can I bring my own wine into a restaurant in Tennessee?

Gov. Haslam taps newest ABC Commissioner

Tennessee ABC Director Clay Byrd resigning

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Hail to the chief: Tennessee ABC names new top dog

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Hail to the chief: Tennessee ABC names new top dog

Jan 31, 2019

Russell F. Thomas

Drumroll please  . . . cue the trumpets for the fanfare . . .

Russell F. Thomas was named Director for the Tennessee Alcoholic Beverage Commission at today’s regular TABC meeting.  Director Thomas assumes the top leadership position following the resignation of Interim Director Zack Blair and former Director Clay Byrd. 

The Tullahoma native holds a B.A. in political science from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.  He was an Alpha Tau Omega.

Thomas earned his J.D. from UT in 2003.  He practiced for four years as an Assistant District Attorney General in Nashville, where he “prosecuted hundreds of misdemeanor and felony cases, including D.U.I. drug offenses, white-collar offenses and murder,” according to Justia.

He worked as a solo practitioner from 2007 until his appointment, where he specialized in criminal defense, DUI and general civil litigation.  He is a 2014 Fellow of the Nashville Bar Foundation.

Thomas’ wife, Mary Beth Thomas, serves as General Counsel to the Tennessee Secretary of State, where she has worked since 2013.  We suspect they are former buddies from UT Knoxville, from which Mary Beth Thomas holds a B.S. in Finance and a 2003 J.D.  Mary Beth Thomas is an alum of our firm, Waller, where she worked as a litigator. 

All this talking about the Tennessee ABC reminds us of Midland’s hit song, “Drinkin’ Problem”

“People say I got a drinkin’ problem

But I got no problem drinkin’ at all

They keep on talkin’

Drawing conclusions

They call it a problem,

I call it a solution.”

Drinking is our business and it ain’t no problem. 

We welcome Director Thomas and wish him well in his new position.

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New TABC Director?

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Category: abc

01.30.19

The Tennessee Alcoholic Beverage Commission agenda has officially been published, but all eyes for this Thursday’s meeting at 10 a.m. will be focused on an item conspicuously absent:  Will the Commission name a new Director?

As federal employees headed back to work this week, the top two positions at the Tennessee ABC remain vacant.  We understand that the Commission has been quietly winnowing down a list of candidates for the Director’s position.  Although liquor gossip is usually insanely rampant, we have heard nothing about a likely successor to Clay Byrd.

We will be on the edge of our seats at the meeting tomorrow and certainly keep you posted.

Meanwhile, former Interim Director Zack Blair has assumed the role of Director of Legislation and Rules at the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services.  We have been remiss in not congratulating Mr. Blair for his fabulous new gig.  Mr. Blair departed the ABC in late December for what he describes as the perfect position for him to make a difference.

We will sorely miss Mr. Blair and wish him the best of continued success.

Mr. Blair’s legacy has national implications, now that he is the named defendant in the pending U.S. Supreme Court case that was recently heard for argument and is expected to be decided in June of this year.  If anyone would like to read more details about this fascinating dormant commerce clause argument, or is in need of a sure cure for insomnia, here is a link to the transcript of the Supreme Court hearing.

As always, please stay tuned for more details about leadership at the Tennessee ABC and the Tennessee Wine & Spirits Retailers Association v. Blair decision.

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Tennessee ABC puts the smack down on Jell-O shots

Dead again: Court strikes down Tennessee residency requirement for liquor store owners

Can I bring my own wine into a restaurant in Tennessee?

Gov. Haslam taps newest ABC Commissioner

Tennessee ABC Director Clay Byrd resigning

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New TABC Director?

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New TABC Director?

Jan 30, 2019

The Tennessee Alcoholic Beverage Commission agenda has officially been published, but all eyes for this Thursday’s meeting at 10 a.m. will be focused on an item conspicuously absent:  Will the Commission name a new Director?

As federal employees headed back to work this week, the top two positions at the Tennessee ABC remain vacant.  We understand that the Commission has been quietly winnowing down a list of candidates for the Director’s position.  Although liquor gossip is usually insanely rampant, we have heard nothing about a likely successor to Clay Byrd.

We will be on the edge of our seats at the meeting tomorrow and certainly keep you posted.

Meanwhile, former Interim Director Zack Blair has assumed the role of Director of Legislation and Rules at the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services.  We have been remiss in not congratulating Mr. Blair for his fabulous new gig.  Mr. Blair departed the ABC in late December for what he describes as the perfect position for him to make a difference.

We will sorely miss Mr. Blair and wish him the best of continued success.

Mr. Blair’s legacy has national implications, now that he is the named defendant in the pending U.S. Supreme Court case that was recently heard for argument and is expected to be decided in June of this year.  If anyone would like to read more details about this fascinating dormant commerce clause argument, or is in need of a sure cure for insomnia, here is a link to the transcript of the Supreme Court hearing.

As always, please stay tuned for more details about leadership at the Tennessee ABC and the Tennessee Wine & Spirits Retailers Association v. Blair decision.

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How does the federal shutdown affect my liquor license application?

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Category: TTB, brewery, winery, wholesaler, Tax and Trade Bureau

01.02.19

As of today, January 2, 2019, the continued closure of the federal government should have very little impact on pending liquor license applications. If the federal shutdown continues for much longer, we expect that backlogs will persist, even after a budget is approved and Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) workers return to their jobs.

One thing is clear, though: no new applications will be approved until the budget impasse is resolved. That includes transfers in bond, formulas, COLAs and anything else that requires approval by TTB.

Keep in mind that state and local governments are not affected by the federal shutdown.  There are no delays with the Tennessee ABC or local beer boards.

We also understand that the IRS is continuing to process applications for new federal identification numbers, known as EIN’s, which are required for every new company.

Because of the holidays, we expect that TTB is not too far behind in its review of basic permits, DSP’s, brewer’s notices, TIB’s and other federal permit applications. Both the public and private sector were sufficiently distracted by Santa, Father Time and other holiday festivities.

The TTB on-line filing system seems to be functioning as normal. We encourage folks to continue filing applications online, with the understanding that no one is going to review them until TTB returns to work.

A prolonged shutdown of the federal government will lead to a significant backlog in application review, which we expect to continue long after TTB workers return to their desks. Before the shutdown, TTB indicated the following normal processing times for applications:

Type Average days to process permits
Brewery 86
DSP 71
Winery 85
Wholesaler 73


It is fairly reasonable to presume that for every business day TTB staff is not working on applications, the review time will increase by another day.

This has to be particularly disappointing for TTB workers, who have been successfully toiling for months to reduce the backlog of applications and approval times.

Conjures up a Styx classic:

We wish our friends at TTB well and know workers look forward to a speedy return to the building mountain of applications.

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How does the federal shutdown affect my liquor license application?

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How does the federal shutdown affect my liquor license application?

Jan 2, 2019

As of today, January 2, 2019, the continued closure of the federal government should have very little impact on pending liquor license applications. If the federal shutdown continues for much longer, we expect that backlogs will persist, even after a budget is approved and Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) workers return to their jobs.

One thing is clear, though: no new applications will be approved until the budget impasse is resolved. That includes transfers in bond, formulas, COLAs and anything else that requires approval by TTB.

Keep in mind that state and local governments are not affected by the federal shutdown.  There are no delays with the Tennessee ABC or local beer boards.

We also understand that the IRS is continuing to process applications for new federal identification numbers, known as EIN’s, which are required for every new company.

Because of the holidays, we expect that TTB is not too far behind in its review of basic permits, DSP’s, brewer’s notices, TIB’s and other federal permit applications. Both the public and private sector were sufficiently distracted by Santa, Father Time and other holiday festivities.

The TTB on-line filing system seems to be functioning as normal. We encourage folks to continue filing applications online, with the understanding that no one is going to review them until TTB returns to work.

A prolonged shutdown of the federal government will lead to a significant backlog in application review, which we expect to continue long after TTB workers return to their desks. Before the shutdown, TTB indicated the following normal processing times for applications:

Type Average days to process permits
Brewery 86
DSP 71
Winery 85
Wholesaler 73


It is fairly reasonable to presume that for every business day TTB staff is not working on applications, the review time will increase by another day.

This has to be particularly disappointing for TTB workers, who have been successfully toiling for months to reduce the backlog of applications and approval times.

Conjures up a Styx classic:

We wish our friends at TTB well and know workers look forward to a speedy return to the building mountain of applications.

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RJ O’Hara Highlights the Complexities of Liquor Licenses for Hotels

“…since liquor licensing is a subset of administrative law, it is fraught with exceptions. For example, there are states that have a combined quota and direct issue system, depending on the sort of place that the applicant is attempting to license. California and Florida are such states. And in virtually all states, hotels are exempted […]

The post RJ O’Hara Highlights the Complexities of Liquor Licenses for Hotels appeared first on Flaherty & O'Hara.

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Catering conundrum created by Tennessee RLPS

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Category: ABC, catering, RLPS

12.26.18

The Tennessee ABC’s fancy new online filing system known as RLPS has changed the landscape for liquor licensing in Tennessee.  The system generally works well.

Notices of catered events, however, present an opportunity for the system to do better.

Obtaining a catering license works like any other liquor license application. Once the catering license is issued, the problem begins for many caterers.

In order to file a notice of catered event, the person filing the notice must have access to the full license record. A notice of catered event essentially creates an amendment to the catering license. This means, if an assistant manager is tasked with filing notices of catered event, the assistant manager can also go in and change the ownership, criminal history disclosure of owners or otherwise amend the entire catering license.

We do not see this as a problem for mom-and-pop operations where mom and pop own the catering business and file their own notices of catered event.

The real issue is for larger companies that hold catering licenses. We do not recommend that on-site managers be granted access to RLPS for purposes of filing notices of catered event. Even if the on-site manager is not malicious, it is far too easy to “mess up” the RLPS record.  Because the RLPS system contains disclosures upon which the license is statutorily based, even inadvertent amendments can affect the underlying qualification of the applicant to hold a license, potentially causing disclosure issues with the ABC and leading to sanctions.

According to the ABC, this is an RLPS system limitation that cannot easily be fixed. Allowing an on-site manager to file notices of catered event, without having access to the rest of the license record in RLPS, is going to require an upgrade to the underlying software that powers RLPS.

Another anomaly with filing notices of catered events is the amendment process. A notice of catered event is an amendment to the liquor license in the RLPS system. As an amendment, the status of the amendment – the notice of catered event – will show up as “In Review,” as if the notice of catered event needs approval. We have been assured that the ABC is not approving catering notices. It is just an RLPS thing.

We advise folks to disregard the “In Review” flag and know that once a notice of catered event is properly filed, no further action is required.

Sick and tired of Christmas songs, how about a little Weird Al’s Eat It, courtesy of our friend Willa:

So eat it

I don't care if you're full

Just eat it, eat it

Open up your mouth and feed it

Stay tuned for more developments with RLPS.

Subscribe Now!

Tennessee ABC puts the smack down on Jell-O shots

Dead again: Court strikes down Tennessee residency requirement for liquor store owners

Can I bring my own wine into a restaurant in Tennessee?

Gov. Haslam taps newest ABC Commissioner

Tennessee ABC Director Clay Byrd resigning

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Catering conundrum created by Tennessee RLPS

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Catering conundrum created by Tennessee RLPS

Dec 26, 2018

The Tennessee ABC’s fancy new online filing system known as RLPS has changed the landscape for liquor licensing in Tennessee.  The system generally works well.

Notices of catered events, however, present an opportunity for the system to do better.

Obtaining a catering license works like any other liquor license application. Once the catering license is issued, the problem begins for many caterers.

In order to file a notice of catered event, the person filing the notice must have access to the full license record. A notice of catered event essentially creates an amendment to the catering license. This means, if an assistant manager is tasked with filing notices of catered event, the assistant manager can also go in and change the ownership, criminal history disclosure of owners or otherwise amend the entire catering license.

We do not see this as a problem for mom-and-pop operations where mom and pop own the catering business and file their own notices of catered event.

The real issue is for larger companies that hold catering licenses. We do not recommend that on-site managers be granted access to RLPS for purposes of filing notices of catered event. Even if the on-site manager is not malicious, it is far too easy to “mess up” the RLPS record.  Because the RLPS system contains disclosures upon which the license is statutorily based, even inadvertent amendments can affect the underlying qualification of the applicant to hold a license, potentially causing disclosure issues with the ABC and leading to sanctions.

According to the ABC, this is an RLPS system limitation that cannot easily be fixed. Allowing an on-site manager to file notices of catered event, without having access to the rest of the license record in RLPS, is going to require an upgrade to the underlying software that powers RLPS.

Another anomaly with filing notices of catered events is the amendment process. A notice of catered event is an amendment to the liquor license in the RLPS system. As an amendment, the status of the amendment – the notice of catered event – will show up as “In Review,” as if the notice of catered event needs approval. We have been assured that the ABC is not approving catering notices. It is just an RLPS thing.

We advise folks to disregard the “In Review” flag and know that once a notice of catered event is properly filed, no further action is required.

Sick and tired of Christmas songs, how about a little Weird Al’s Eat It, courtesy of our friend Willa:

So eat it

I don't care if you're full

Just eat it, eat it

Open up your mouth and feed it

Stay tuned for more developments with RLPS.

Continue reading
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Starwood data breach serves as wakeup call to Tennessee bars, hotels and restaurants

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Category: data breach, hacking, cybersecurity

11.30.18

We suspect that thousands of Tennessee restaurants, hotels, bars and other hospitality businesses gather personal information from their customers for marketing purposes.  

It’s just a birthdate, address, anniversary, spouse’s name – good stuff to know, right?

That’s all fine and dandy until some hacker steals the information.  Marriott’s disclosure that 500 million Starwood Hotel guests’ personal data was stolen should be a wakeup call. 

We’ve had Beastie Boys’ classic Paul Revere stuck in our head all morning:

The kid said, “Get ready ‘cause this ain’t funny

My name’s Mike D and I’m about to get money”

Pulled out the jammy, aimed it at the sky

He yelled, “Stick ‘em up!” and let two fly

Hands went up and people hit the floor

He wasted two kids that ran for the door

Don’t expect Mike D to come knocking on the door at your restaurant demanding you to turn over personal information squirreled away in a computer somewhere in the back office.  Modern Mike D is coming through the internet.  He’s gonna hack your computer while you are sleeping off that last martini.

Don’t delay.  Call or email your IT person now and review your security procedures to ensure that employee data, as well as customer data, is protected.  Although your system may not be sophisticated enough to withstand cyberattacks from the likes of Mike D in Ukraine, anything you do is better than nothing.

Here are a few simple tips from Waller’s IT team:

Physically lock the office where the computer is located when it is not in use Use a password to log in Use complex passwords and change them regularly Create very simple software that requires password changes, which annoy the heck out of us but work Encrypt your hard drive with BitLocker or other encryption software, so that if the computer or drive is stolen, the data is not easily read Password protect important files, particularly those that contain personal data such as social security numbers and dates of birth

One of the easiest things to do is minimize the amount of personal information you amass.  Although an owner needs employee data, do you really need personal data on your customers?

Heed the warning and be on the lookout for Mike D.

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Victim of a cyberattack? Here's what the SEC says you should do

10 ways you can protect your company from a cyberattack

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Starwood data breach serves as wakeup call to Tennessee bars, hotels and restaurants

blog

Starwood data breach serves as wakeup call to Tennessee bars, hotels and restaurants

Nov 30, 2018

We suspect that thousands of Tennessee restaurants, hotels, bars and other hospitality businesses gather personal information from their customers for marketing purposes.  

It’s just a birthdate, address, anniversary, spouse’s name – good stuff to know, right?

That’s all fine and dandy until some hacker steals the information.  Marriott’s disclosure that 500 million Starwood Hotel guests’ personal data was stolen should be a wakeup call. 

We’ve had Beastie Boys’ classic Paul Revere stuck in our head all morning:

The kid said, “Get ready ‘cause this ain’t funny

My name’s Mike D and I’m about to get money”

Pulled out the jammy, aimed it at the sky

He yelled, “Stick ‘em up!” and let two fly

Hands went up and people hit the floor

He wasted two kids that ran for the door

Don’t expect Mike D to come knocking on the door at your restaurant demanding you to turn over personal information squirreled away in a computer somewhere in the back office.  Modern Mike D is coming through the internet.  He’s gonna hack your computer while you are sleeping off that last martini.

Don’t delay.  Call or email your IT person now and review your security procedures to ensure that employee data, as well as customer data, is protected.  Although your system may not be sophisticated enough to withstand cyberattacks from the likes of Mike D in Ukraine, anything you do is better than nothing.

Here are a few simple tips from Waller’s IT team:

Physically lock the office where the computer is located when it is not in use Use a password to log in Use complex passwords and change them regularly Create very simple software that requires password changes, which annoy the heck out of us but work Encrypt your hard drive with BitLocker or other encryption software, so that if the computer or drive is stolen, the data is not easily read Password protect important files, particularly those that contain personal data such as social security numbers and dates of birth

One of the easiest things to do is minimize the amount of personal information you amass.  Although an owner needs employee data, do you really need personal data on your customers?

Heed the warning and be on the lookout for Mike D.

Continue reading
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Flaherty & O’Hara Featured on Restaurant Life Radio Show

Flaherty & O’Hara was honored to be featured in an interview with Keith Christy on his Philadelphia radio show, Restaurant Life. R.J. O’Hara and Stan Wolowski spoke with Keith about the history of Flaherty & O’Hara, the services that the firm provides, and the uniqueness of both the Firm and Pennsylvania Liquor Laws. Have a […]

The post Flaherty & O’Hara Featured on Restaurant Life Radio Show appeared first on Flaherty & O'Hara.

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Never gonna keep the Tennessee Distiller's Guild down

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Category: distillers, Tennessee Distiller’s Guild

11.07.18

A look back at the inaugural whiskey festival in 2014. 

Twenty-nine of the licensed distillers in Tennessee poured their finest at the third annual Grains & Grits Festival in Townsend, Tennessee this past weekend.  The distillers rocked a crowd of approximately 750 thirsty fans, which we figure was pretty much the perfect crowd for the evening.  Rocked on by FGL House band January Noise, there was a ton of energy, enthusiasm and thirst quenching without long lines.

The Third Annual Grains & Grits reminded us how far the Tennessee Distiller’s Guild has come since its first whiskey festival, in the middle of the speedway at the Tennessee State Fair on September 6, 2014. During the past 4 years, Tennessee Distillers have been laying back aged whiskey, with a healthy number of distilleries pouring samples of really tasty samples at this weekend’s fest.

To all the Tennessee distillers out there:  We’re really proud of you guys.  You are killing it.

Chumbawamba’s all-too-catchy thub-thumping is stuck in our heads: 

He drinks a whisky drink

He drinks a vodka drink

He drinks a lager drink

He drinks a cider drink . . .

I get knocked down, but

I get up again

You’re never gonna keep

Me down.

Grains & Grits is a fundraiser for the Tennessee Distiller’s Guild, a 501(c)(6) business league that supports the whiskey industry in Tennessee.  We hope to see you at the Fourth Annual Grains & Grits next Fall. 

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Craft distillers, brewers are big winners with Trump tax cuts

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Never gonna keep the Tennessee Distiller's Guild down

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Never gonna keep the Tennessee Distiller's Guild down

Nov 7, 2018

A look back at the inaugural whiskey festival in 2014. 

Twenty-nine of the licensed distillers in Tennessee poured their finest at the third annual Grains & Grits Festival in Townsend, Tennessee this past weekend.  The distillers rocked a crowd of approximately 750 thirsty fans, which we figure was pretty much the perfect crowd for the evening.  Rocked on by FGL House band January Noise, there was a ton of energy, enthusiasm and thirst quenching without long lines.

The Third Annual Grains & Grits reminded us how far the Tennessee Distiller’s Guild has come since its first whiskey festival, in the middle of the speedway at the Tennessee State Fair on September 6, 2014. During the past 4 years, Tennessee Distillers have been laying back aged whiskey, with a healthy number of distilleries pouring samples of really tasty samples at this weekend’s fest.

To all the Tennessee distillers out there:  We’re really proud of you guys.  You are killing it.

Chumbawamba’s all-too-catchy thub-thumping is stuck in our heads: 

He drinks a whisky drink

He drinks a vodka drink

He drinks a lager drink

He drinks a cider drink . . .

I get knocked down, but

I get up again

You’re never gonna keep

Me down.

Grains & Grits is a fundraiser for the Tennessee Distiller’s Guild, a 501(c)(6) business league that supports the whiskey industry in Tennessee.  We hope to see you at the Fourth Annual Grains & Grits next Fall. 

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Flaherty & O’Hara Featured in Pittsburgh Post-Gazette for Decision to Close on Election Day

Flaherty & O’Hara thinks it is important not only for everyone to vote, but for everyone to have the opportunity, if they choose, to get involved in a campaign. We decided we should close on all election days to give our employees and partners the time to engage in the electoral process. Our decision to […]

The post Flaherty & O’Hara Featured in Pittsburgh Post-Gazette for Decision to Close on Election Day appeared first on Flaherty & O'Hara.

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The future is now at the Metro Nashville Beer Board

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Category: Beer Board, permits, permitting

10.23.18

Today, the Metro Nashville Beer Board makes history, becoming the first Tennessee beer board to officially enter cyberspace.

On Monday, Beer Board Executive Director Benton McDonough and Amanda Webb demonstrated the new online filing system for beer board applications, and now, it's up and running.

Stardate 10.23.2018: The Metro Beer Board filing system is live.  You can now file beer applications online at this link https://epermits.nashville.gov/#/   The beer application is in the list on the left-hand side.

Our own Kimberly Faye Clark filed the very first application online.  Particularly fitting since Kimberly also filed the first RLPS application with the Tennessee ABC.

Gone are the days of yesteryear when you had to schlep downtown to the Howard School Building and present an original application, signed in the presence of a notary.  Also gone are the days where you had to trudge back downtown to pick up an original beer permit, signed in blue ink by the Executive Director.

Although the entire Waller staff will miss seeing the smiling faces of Amanda, Benton, Doug, Jesus and Terrence at the beer board, the convenience and time savings from filing online are greatly appreciated.

In addition to being able to file beer applications, the new system also allows you to file multiple attachments online and specify outdoor seating areas.  You can also schedule your beer inspection online.

Online filing fees must be paid by credit card, with the dreaded 2.3% convenience fee.

Before you file the application, you can print the Beer Board checklist and see a list of items needed to complete the application.  Once filed, the beer board sends an email with a receipt and access code to complete the application.

Currently, temporary permits are issued the old-fashioned way, in person, at the Howard School building. 

Renewals will continue to be simple.  Unlike the intense RLPS renewal process for Tennessee ABC liquor applications, the Metro Beer Board will simply require paying the privilege tax.  No renewal applications are currently planned.

As much as we despise the catchy Timbuk 3 1980s one-hit wonder “The Future’s So Bright, I Gotta Wear Shades,” it seems apropos:

I study nuclear science

I love my classes

I got a crazy teacher, he wears dark glasses

Things are going great, and they're only getting better

I'm doing all right, getting good grades

The future's so bright, I gotta wear shades

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Metro Nashville Beer Board toasts new Tennessee open carry law

Metro Nashville Beer Board announced temporary beer permit charge

Original author: William T. Cheek III
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The future is now at the Metro Nashville Beer Board

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Category: Beer Board, permits, permitting

10.23.18

Today, the Metro Nashville Beer Board makes history, becoming the first Tennessee beer board to officially enter cyberspace.

On Monday, Beer Board Executive Director Benton McDonough and Amanda Webb demonstrated the new online filing system for beer board applications, and now, it's up and running.

Stardate 10.23.2018: The Metro Beer Board filing system is live.  You can now file beer applications online at this link https://epermits.nashville.gov/#/   The beer application is in the list on the left-hand side.

Our own Kimberly Faye Clark filed the very first application online.  Particularly fitting since Kimberly also filed the first RLPS application with the Tennessee ABC.

Gone are the days of yesteryear when you had to schlep downtown to the Howard School Building and present an original application, signed in the presence of a notary.  Also gone are the days where you had to trudge back downtown to pick up an original beer permit, signed in blue ink by the Executive Director.

Although the entire Waller staff will miss seeing the smiling faces of Amanda, Benton, Doug, Jesus and Terrence at the beer board, the convenience and time savings from filing online are greatly appreciated.

In addition to being able to file beer applications, the new system also allows you to file multiple attachments online and specify outdoor seating areas.  You can also schedule your beer inspection online.

Online filing fees must be paid by credit card, with the dreaded 2.3% convenience fee.

Before you file the application, you can print the Beer Board checklist and see a list of items needed to complete the application.  Once filed, the beer board sends an email with a receipt and access code to complete the application.

Currently, temporary permits are issued the old-fashioned way, in person, at the Howard School building. 

Renewals will continue to be simple.  Unlike the intense RLPS renewal process for Tennessee ABC liquor applications, the Metro Beer Board will simply require paying the privilege tax.  No renewal applications are currently planned.

As much as we despise the catchy Timbuk 3 1980s one-hit wonder “The Future’s So Bright, I Gotta Wear Shades,” it seems apropos:

I study nuclear science

I love my classes

I got a crazy teacher, he wears dark glasses

Things are going great, and they're only getting better

I'm doing all right, getting good grades

The future's so bright, I gotta wear shades

Subscribe Now!

Metro Nashville Beer Board toasts new Tennessee open carry law

Metro Nashville Beer Board announced temporary beer permit charge

Continue reading
  555 Hits
  0 Comments
555 Hits
0 Comments

The future is now at the Metro Nashville Beer Board

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The future is now at the Metro Nashville Beer Board

Oct 23, 2018

Today, the Metro Nashville Beer Board makes history, becoming the first Tennessee beer board to officially enter cyberspace.

On Monday, Beer Board Executive Director Benton McDonough and Amanda Webb demonstrated the new online filing system for beer board applications, and now, it's up and running.

Stardate 10.23.2018: The Metro Beer Board filing system is live.  You can now file beer applications online at this link https://epermits.nashville.gov/#/   The beer application is in the list on the left-hand side.

Our own Kimberly Faye Clark filed the very first application online.  Particularly fitting since Kimberly also filed the first RLPS application with the Tennessee ABC.

Gone are the days of yesteryear when you had to schlep downtown to the Howard School Building and present an original application, signed in the presence of a notary.  Also gone are the days where you had to trudge back downtown to pick up an original beer permit, signed in blue ink by the Executive Director.

Although the entire Waller staff will miss seeing the smiling faces of Amanda, Benton, Doug, Jesus and Terrence at the beer board, the convenience and time savings from filing online are greatly appreciated.

In addition to being able to file beer applications, the new system also allows you to file multiple attachments online and specify outdoor seating areas.  You can also schedule your beer inspection online.

Online filing fees must be paid by credit card, with the dreaded 2.3% convenience fee.

Before you file the application, you can print the Beer Board checklist and see a list of items needed to complete the application.  Once filed, the beer board sends an email with a receipt and access code to complete the application.

Currently, temporary permits are issued the old-fashioned way, in person, at the Howard School building. 

Renewals will continue to be simple.  Unlike the intense RLPS renewal process for Tennessee ABC liquor applications, the Metro Beer Board will simply require paying the privilege tax.  No renewal applications are currently planned.

As much as we despise the catchy Timbuk 3 1980s one-hit wonder “The Future’s So Bright, I Gotta Wear Shades,” it seems apropos:

I study nuclear science

I love my classes

I got a crazy teacher, he wears dark glasses

Things are going great, and they're only getting better

I'm doing all right, getting good grades

The future's so bright, I gotta wear shades

Continue reading
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  0 Comments
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